Points - Recent Research
Berberine Increases Glucose Uptake and Intracellular ROS Levels by Promoting Sirtuin 3 Ubiquitination
Efficacy of Acupuncture Combined with Local Anesthesia in Ischemic Stroke Patients with Carotid Artery Stenting
Hu Gan Pian, a Traditional Chinese Medicine, Inhbits Liver Cancer Growth In Vitro and in vivo by Inducing Autophagy and Cell Cycle Arrest

Berberine Increases Glucose Uptake and Intracellular ROS Levels by Promoting Sirtuin 3 Ubiquitination

Li W1, et al.

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Berberine improves insulin sensitivity and ovulation function in PCOS patients. However, the mechanism by which berberine initiates glucose metabolism-related signaling pathways in ovarian cells remains unknown. This study unveiled a new mechanism by which berberine promotes ovarian cell glucose uptake, and demonstrated that SIRT3 ubiquitination is involved in the insulin sensitizing effect of berberine.
METHODS: Berberine was used at different concentrations to treat cultured KGN cells. Then, cell viability, cell apoptosis, intracellular ROS levels, mitochondrial depolarization and activation of related signaling pathways were evaluated.
RESULTS: Berberine administration led to mitochondrial depolarization and AMP accumulation by promoting SIRT3 ubiquitination. We confirmed that AMP accumulation activated AMPK signaling and further promoted glucose uptake. Meanwhile, berberine reduced the activity of mitochondrial complex I in a dose-depended manner, but not that of mitochondrial complex II. Furthermore, intracellular ROS levels and the expression of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway related factors increased with berberine concentration. Berberine caused significant SIRT3 ubiquitination and degradation by activating the AMPK pathway and increasing intracellular ROS levels. Interestingly, berberine induced ubiquitination paralleled the increased FOXO3a phosphorylation and FOXO3a/Parkin pathway activation.
CONCLUSIONS: Berberine promotes glucose uptake and inhibits mitochondrial function by promoting SIRT3 ubiquitination, and is likely to regulate autophagy related function in ovarian cells by activating the AMPK pathway. These findings may provide novel insights into the development of drugs for the treatment of abnormal reproductive functions of the ovary.

Biomed Pharmacother.2019 Nov 6;121:109563. doi: 10.1016/j.biopha.2019.109563. [Epub ahead of print]

Source: PubMed

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Efficacy of Acupuncture Combined with Local Anesthesia in Ischemic Stroke Patients with Carotid Artery Stenting

Xiong W1, et al.

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of electro-acupuncture (EA) or transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) on perioperative cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neurological function in ischemic stroke (IS) patients undergoing carotid artery stenting (CAS).
METHODS: In total, 124 consecutive IS patients were randomly allocated to the EA, TEAS, and sham groups (groups A, T, and S; 41, 42, and 41 cases, respectively) by software-derived random-number sequence. Groups A and T received EA and TEAS, respectively, at the Shuigou (GV 26) and Baihui (GV 20), Hegu (LI4) and Waiguan (TE 5) acupoints. Group S received sham EA. The stimulation was started from 30 min before surgery until the end of the operation. The primary outcome was the CBF at 30 min after surgery, which was measured by transcranial Doppler sonography. The secondary outcomes included hyperperfusion incidence and neurological function. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and General Evaluation Scale (GES) scores were recorded at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively.
RESULTS: Mean CBF velocity at 30 min after surgery in groups A and T was much lower than that in Group S (P < 0.05); the incidence of hyperperfusion in Groups A and T was also lower than that in group S (P <0.05). Acupuncture was an independent factor associated with reduced incidence of hyperperfusion (OR=0.042; 95% CI: 0.002-0.785; =0.034). NIHSS and GES scores improved significantly at 1 week postoperatively in Groups A and T than in Group S (P < 0.05). Relative to Group S, groups A and T exhibited significantly lower incidences of moderate pain, as well as higher incidences of satisfaction with anesthesia, at 1 day postoperatively (P < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: EA or TEAS administered in combination with local anesthesia during CAS can inhibit transient increases in CBF, reduce the incidence of postoperative hyperperfusion, and improve neurological function. (Registration No. ChiCTR-IOR-15007447).

Chin J Integr Med.2019 Nov 8. doi: 10.1007/s11655-019-3174-8. [Epub ahead of print]

Source: PubMed

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Hu Gan Pian, a Traditional Chinese Medicine, Inhbits Liver Cancer Growth In Vitro and in vivo by Inducing Autophagy and Cell Cycle Arrest

Gao X1, et al.

Abstract
Huganpian (HGP), a traditional chinese medicine composed of 6 herbs (Radix Bupleuri, herba Artemisiae Scopariae, Radix Isatidis, Fructus Schisandrae Chinensis seu Fructus Schisandrae Sphenantherae, Pulvis Fellis, Semen Phaseoli Radiati.), possesses excellent therapeutic effects in clinical application. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the anti-tumor activity and the underlying mechanisms of HGP in liver cancer. The results of this study indicated that HGP effectively inhibited liver cancer growth in vitro and in vivo in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, HGP exerted its anti-tumor effects by triggering autophagy with increased LC3Ⅱ and beclin1 levels and arrested the cell cycle on G0-G1 phase by downregulating the expressions of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and cyclinE1 in vitro and in vivo. Meanwhile, HGP did not induce apoptosis significantly. Importantly, we also confirmed that there were fewer side effects of HGP on immune system. Taken together, our findings suggest for the first time that HGP may become a promising drug or adjuvant drug with a lower toxicity for liver cancer treatment in the future.

Biomed Pharmacother. 2019 Nov 4;120:109469. doi: 10.1016/j.biopha.2019.109469. [Epub ahead of print]

Source: PubMed

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